Assault & Battery Charges

Dedicated Legal Representation in Orlando

As an Orlando criminal defense firm, Longwelll Lawyers is committed to providing exceptional legal counsel for individuals in need of representation. With more than two decades of experience under our belts, we understand how to handle a wide range of charges and effectively navigate the legal system.

Whether you are facing aggravated assault charges or a misdemeanor battery charge, it is important to speak with an attorney who understands your situation. When you work with us, you can rest assured that our legal team will put your interests first, making it a priority to secure the best results possible.

Defining Assault Charges

Assault can be charged as either a misdemeanor or felony. That means that no matter how minor your charges may seem, it is crucial that you take quick action to defend your rights against the opposing prosecution.

To be convicted of an assault crime, the prosecution must prove:

  • You intentionally and unlawfully threatened (by word or action) to do violence against another person.
  • At the time of the crime, you appeared to have the full ability to carry out that threat.
  • You created a well-founded fear that violence was about to take place in the mind of the victim
  • If aggravated assault, they must also prove that the assault was made with a deadly weapon and was made by a full-formed, conscious intent to commit the crime.

A deadly weapon can be anything from a gun to a hammer or baseball bat. If charged with a misdemeanor offense, you could face 60 days in jail, 6 months of probation and up to $500 in fines. A felony will result in up to 5 years in prison and probation and up to $5,000 in fines.

Battery Charges in Florida

Similar to assault, battery can be charged as a felony or a misdemeanor, depending on the severity and circumstances of the crime. A person may be accused of battery if they intentionally touch, strike or cause bodily harm to another person against their will. This could include pushing, grabbing, or even spitting on another person. If the battery causes great bodily harm or an individual has a prior conviction they may be charged with a felony offense. If a person knowingly causes great bodily harm, or involves the use of a deadly weapon (or the victim is known to be pregnant), it could be charged as aggravated battery.

A first degree misdemeanor battery will typically result in up to 1 year in jail and probation and up to $1,000 in fines. A felony battery may result in up to 5 years in prison and probation as well as a $5,000 fine. Lastly, aggravated battery can bring up to 15 years in prison and probation and up to $10,000 in fines.

If you or a loved one has been charged with assault, battery or any other type of violent crime, please contact our firm right away. We are here to aggressively defend your legal rights!